Catherine Bagwell

Professor of Psychology

Catherine Bagwell

Contact

770.784.8686

Dr. Bagwell’s interest in psychology was sparked in her first-year introductory psychology course at the University of Richmond, and her first taste of research came soon after as part of a class in which students worked together on a research project on children’s peer relationships.  After graduating from Richmond summa cum laude with a B.S. in psychology in 1994, she attended Duke University’s Ph.D. program in clinical psychology and graduated in 1999.  Her research at Duke focused on the peer relationships of aggressive and antisocial children, and her clinical work focused on prevention and intervention efforts for children at risk for Conduct Disorder.  Dr. Bagwell completed her clinical internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh and then returned to her alma mater as Assistant Professor of Psychology.  At Richmond she embraced the opportunity to work closely with students in a liberal arts environment and to collaborate with faculty invested in undergraduate education.  During her time there, Dr. Bagwell was recognized with a number of teaching awards, including the University’s Distinguished Educator Award and the Arts and Sciences Outstanding Mentor Award.  She was Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and MacEldin Trawick Professor of Psychology at Richmond from 1999-2012.  In 2012, she moved to Colgate University for four wonderful (and cold) years as Professor of Psychology.  In 2016, she joined the Oxford faculty and is eager to work with Oxford students in similar collaborative endeavors as she experienced as an undergraduate student.  Dr. Bagwell lives in Oxford with her husband, Douglas Hicks, and their two children.


Education

BS| University of Richmond| 1994

MA| Duke University| 1996

PhD| Duke University| 1999

Courses Taught

Adolescent Psychology

Child Psychopathology

Social Bonds: Parents, Peers, and Partners (Discovery Seminar)

Publications

BOOKS

Bagwell, C. L., & Schmidt, M. E.  (2011).  Friendships in childhood and adolescence.  New York:  Guilford. 

Mayes, B. R., Bagwell, C. L., & Erkulwater, J. E.  (2009).  Medicating children:  ADHD and the politics of mental health.  Cambridge, MA:  Harvard University Press.

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS

Bagwell, C. L., & Bukowski, W. M. (in press).  Friendship in childhood and adolescence: Features, Effects, and Processes.  In Rubin, K. H., Bukowski, W. M., & Laursen, B. (Eds.), Handbook of peer interactions, relationships, and groups (2nd ed.).

Kochel, K. P., Bagwell, C. L., Ladd, G. W., & Rudolph, K. D. (in press).  Do positive peer relations mitigate transactions between depressive symptoms and peer victimization in adolescence?  Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology.

Kochel, K., Ladd, G., Bagwell, C., Yabko, B.  (2015).  Bully/victim profiles’ differential risk for worsening peer acceptance: The role of friendship.  Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 41, 38-45.

Bagwell, C. L., Kochel, K. P., & Schmidt, M. E.  (2015).  Friendship and happiness in adolescence.  In M. Demir (Ed.), Friendship and happiness: Across the life-span and cultures (pp. 99-116).  New York, NY: Springer.

Bagwell, C. L., & Schmidt, M. E.  (2011).  The friendship quality of overtly and relationally victimized and aggressive children.  Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 57, 158-185. 

Bukowski, W. M., Schwartzman, A., Santo, J., Bagwell, C., & Adams, R.  (2009).  Reactivity and distortions in the self:  Narcissism, types of aggression, and the functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during early adolescence.  Development and Psychopathology, 21, 1249-1262.

Mayes, B. R., Bagwell, C. L., & Erkulwater, J. E.  (2008).  ADHD and the rise in stimulant use among children.  Harvard Review of Psychiatry, 16, 151-166. 

Schmidt, M. E., & Bagwell, C. L.  (2007).  The protective role of friendships in overtly and relationally victimized boys and girls.  Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 53, 439-460.

Presentations

Kochel, K. P., Bagwell, C. L., Ladd, G., & Rudolph, K.  (2016, July).  Mutual friendship as a moderator of associations between depressive symptoms and peer victimization in early and late adolescence.  In C. Bagwell (Chair), Associations among relationship problems and internalizing problems in adolescence and early adulthood: The role of friendship.  Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the International Association for Relationship Research, Toronto, Ontario. 

Bagwell, C. L., Kochel, K., McHugh, K.*, Salzman, S.*, Silverman, M.*, Wolf, E.*, Gleckel, E.*, Horoz, N.*, Rodowsky, E.*, & Rosensweig, R.*  (2016, March).  Are depression and happiness associated with friendship quality in emerging adulthood?  A dyadic approach.  In R. Schwartz-Mette (chair), Impacts of positive and negative emotional adjustment on friendship experiences: Moderators and mediators.  Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, Baltimore, MD.

Bagwell, C. L.  (2016, March).  In L. Mayeux (Chair), Emotions in the context of friendships: Benefits and trade-offs.  Symposium discussant at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, Baltimore, MD.

Bagwell, C. L., Schmidt, M. E., & Kochel, K. P.  (2015, March).  Associations among prosocial behavior, depression symptoms, and relational victimization over a school year.  Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA.

Bagwell, C. L.  (2015, March).  In A. Rose (Chair), Friendship and adjustment.  Symposium discussant at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA.

Kochel, K. P., Bagwell, C. L., McHugh, K.*, Salzman, S.*, Silverman, M.*, Rojas, R.*, & Wolf, E.*  (2015, March).  Corumination, friendship quality, and depression:  Dyadic patterns of influence among emerging adult friendship dyads.  Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA.

Wilkinson, R. P., Bukowski, W. M., & Bagwell, C. L.  (2014, April).  Narcissism and the consequences of friendship choice in early adolescence.  Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, Austin, TX.

Henry, L. M.*, Eugenio, M.*, Blevins, E.*, Kochel, K. P., Bagwell, C. L., & Newcomb, A. F. (2013, October).  Emerging adults’ psychological symptom profiles: Differential associations with peer victimization and gender typicality.  Poster presented at the 6th Conference on Emerging Adulthood, Chicago, IL.

Kochel , K. P., Bagwell, C. L., Ladd, G. W., & Kochenderfer Ladd, B. J. (2013, September). Depressive symptoms and gender as risk factors in the development of adolescents’ peer victimization trajectories.  In S. Perren (Chair), Peer victimization and internalizing problems: Longitudinal associations and moderating effects.  Paper presented at the European Conference on Developmental Psychology, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Kochel, K. P., Bagwell, C. L., Ladd, G. W., & Rudolph, K. D.  (2013, April). Does positive peer context buffer prospective associations between early adolescent depressive symptoms and peer victimization?  In N. Sugimura & K.D. Rudolph (Co-chairs), Multi-level predictors of peer victimization: Integrating individual and contextual perspectives.  Paper presented at the Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, WA.

Research Interests

Why do friends matter to us?  How do friendships affect children’s and adolescents’ social and emotional development?  Are friendships only positive influences, or can friends also lead us astray?  Can friends buffer vulnerable youth against challenges in the peer world?  These are the kinds of questions I ask in my research, and they all address the goal of understanding the developmental significance of friendship—how friendships contribute to our adjustment and well-being.  My work is in the area of developmental psychopathology at the intersection of developmental and clinical psychology.  In early studies, I considered the long-term significance of having a close friend and the friendships of specific groups of children, such as highly aggressive children and children with ADHD.  More recently, I have worked with colleagues to investigate connections among friendships and peer victimization, including the friendship quality of children who are victimized and the role of a close friend in buffering against peer victimization.  In addition, my students and I have investigated friendship in early adulthood and considered links between friendship and happiness.