Sarah Fankhauser

Assistant Professor of Biology

Sarah Fankhauser

Contact

770.784.8398

Sarah Fankhauser is an Assistant Professor of Biology. She received her B.S. in Biology with Highest Honors from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2007. She received her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunobiology from Harvard University in 2013. During her graduate work she studied the pathogenesis of Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes and Chlamydia trachomatis.  Her Ph.D. dissertation investigated how C. trachomatis infection suppresses immune function in mice.  From 2013-15, Dr. Fankhauser held the position of Postdoctoral Fellow at the Emory Atlanta campus where she studied the pathogenesis of the bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia.

Dr. Fankhauser came to Oxford in the fall of 2015 and currently teaches Bio 141 and Bio 142.  She is very passionate about the scientific process and looks forward to bringing her enthusiasm to the classroom. Her current area of research interest is host-bacteria interactions and Dr. Fankhauser is excited to investigate the microbial communities at the Oxford Organic Farm. 

Dr. Fankhauser was born and raised in Georgia and enjoys spending time with her husband and daughter.  In her free time she works to improve K-12 science education through the non-profit she started: The Journal of Emerging Investigators (www.emerginginvestigators.org).   


Education

BS| Georgia Institute of Technology| 2007

Ph.D.| Harvard University| 2013

Courses Taught

Bio120, Bio141 and Bio142

Accomplishments

2016 American Society of Microbiology Undergraduate Faculty Research Initiative Fellow

Publications

Sarah C. Fankhauser and Joanna Goldberg. “Mutation of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase contributes to virulence and resistance to reactive nitrogen species in Burkholderia cenocepacia.” Accepted with revisions: Pathogens and Disease.  

 

Sarah C. Fankhauser.  “My winding path to satisfaction.”  2016. Science. 352 (6293): 1606.

 

Sarah Fankhauser and Rebecca Lijek, “Incorporating Primary Scientific Literature in Middle and High School Education.” 2016.   Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education. 17(1):120-124.

 

Rebecca Lijek and Sarah Fankhauser. “Using Scavenger Hunts to Familiarize Students with Scientific Journal Articles.”  2016. Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education. 17(1): 125-128.

 

Laura Gonyar, Sarah Fankhauser, and Joanna Goldberg.  “Single amino acid substitution in homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase is responsible for pigmentation in a subset of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates.”  2015.  Environmental Microbiology and Environmental Microbiology Reports.  7(2): 180-187.

 

Sarah Fankhauser and Michael Starnbach.  “PD-L1 limits the mucosal CD8+ T cell response to C. trachomatis.” 2013. Journal of Immunology. 192(3):1079-90.

 

Sukumaran, B., Mastronunzio, J. E., Narasimhan, S., Fankhauser, S., Uchil, P. D., Levy, R., Graham, M., Colpitts, T. M., Lesser, C. F. and Fikrig, E. “Anaplasma phagocytophilum AptA modulates Erk1/2 signalling.” 2011.  Cellular Microbiology.  13(1):47-61.

 

Presentations

John J. Varga, Sarah C. Fankhauser, Deborah R. Yoder-Himes, and Joanna B. Goldberg. “Tn-seq analysis identifies genes required for Burkholderia cenocepacia survival in a mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease.”  American Society of Microbiology Annual Conference.  New Orleans, LA.  June 2017 (Poster)

 

Elizabeth Johnson and Sarah C. Fankhauser.  “Participation in the primary literature impacts perception and practice of science.”  American Association for the Advancement of Science. Boston, MA. February 2017 (Poster)

 

John Varga, Sarah C. Fankhauser, Deborah R. Yoder-Himes and Joanna Goldberg. “Tn-Seq analysis reveals putative essential genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia chronic granulomatous disease mouse infections.”  Southeast regional Cystic Fibrosis symposium.  Atlanta, GA. April 2016 (Poster)

 

John Varga, Sarah C. Fankhauser, Deborah R. Yoder-Himes and Joanna Goldberg. “Tn-Seq analysis reveals putative essential genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia chronic granulomatous disease mouse infections.”  International Burkholderia cepacia working group meeting. Columbus, OH. April 2016 (Oral presentation)

 

Sarah C. Fankhauser, Melissa Ivey and Joanna Goldberg.  “Pyomelanin Production Contributes To Virulence In The Human Pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.”  American Society of Microbiology Annual Conference. Boston, MA. June 2016 (Poster)

 

Sarah C. Fankhauser and Joanna Goldberg.  “Pyomelanin production in Burkholderia cenocepacia contributes to pathogenesis.”  National IRACDA Conference. San Diego, CA. June 2015 (Poster)

 

Sarah C. Fankhauser and Joanna Goldberg.  “What’s in a Color: Using Bacterial Pigmentation to Study Bacterial Physiology and the Scientific Research Process.”  American Society of Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators.  Dallas, TX.  June 2015 (Oral presentation)

 

Sarah C. Fankhauser and Michael Starnbach.  “CD8+ T cell responses to Chlamydia trachomatis.”  Annual New England Immunology Conference.  Woods Hole, MA.  October 2011 (Poster)

 

Sarah Paglioni and Cammie Lesser.  “Characterization of the Shigella flexneri type III secreted effector IpaJ.”  Boston Bacterial Meeting.  Boston, MA. June 2009 (Poster)

 

Sarah Paglioni and John Kirby.  “Adaptation of Chemotaxis in Bacillus subtilis.” American Society of Microbiology Annual Conference.  Orlando, FL.  June 2006 (Poster)