Effrosyni Seitaridou

Associate Professor of Physics

Frosso Seitaridou is an Associate Professor of Physics. She received her B.A. in Physics from Smith College and her B.E. in Materials Science from Dartmouth College, both in 2002. For her graduate studies she went to the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) where she got her M.S. in 2004 and her Ph.D. in 2008, both in Applied Physics. Her dissertation was in the area of Biophysics, where she used microfluidic technology to study diffusion in the small-numbers limit and the self-assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit.

Dr. Seitaridou joined Oxford in the fall of 2008. She is currently teaching introductory physics courses, both calculus and non-calculus based (PHYS 151-152 and PHYS 141-142, respectively,) as well as sophomore-level physics courses on computational modeling (PHYS 212) and modern physics (PHYS 253). Her research focuses on investigating the communication mechanism of bacterial cells within biofilms that are grown inside microfluidics. She has co-authored articles with undergraduate students and collaborators from diverse subfilelds in physics. She has also co-authored a book on diffusion with Dr. Dan Gillespie titled “Simple Brownian Diffusion: An Introduction to the Standard Theoretical Models,” released in October, 2012 by Oxford University Press. She has received recognition from Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Eta Sigma for excellence in teaching. 

Born and raised in Thessaloniki, Greece, Dr. Seitaridou came to the U.S. in order to pursue her undergraduate and graduate level studies. In her spare time, she enjoys talking about physics, reading, cross-stitching, traditional Greek dancing, and running.


Education

BA| Smith College| 2002

B.Eng| Dartmouth College| 2002

MS| California Institute of Technology (Caltech)| 2004

Ph.D.| California Institute of Technology (Caltech)| 2008

Courses Taught

  • Physics 141: Introductory Physics I with Lab (algebra-based)
  • Physics 142: Introductory Physics II with Lab (algebra-based)
  • Physics 151: General Physics: Mechanics with Lab (calculus-based)
  • Physics 152: General Physics: Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics with Lab (calculus-based)
  • Physics 212: Computational Modeling for Scientists and Engineers with Lab
  • Physics 253: Modern Physics with Lab

 

Accomplishments

  • Phi Eta Sigma award for exellent teaching (2013)
  • Phi Beta Kappa recognition for excellent teaching (2009, 2012, 2013, 2015)

Publications

  • C. Cheng, Y. Dong, M. Dorian, F. Kamili, E. Seitaridou. “Quantifying Biofilm Formation of Sinorhizobium meliloti Bacterial Strains in MIcrofluidic Platforms by Measuring the Diffusion Coefficient of Polystyrene Beads”, Open Journal of Biophysics, Vol. 7, July 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ojbiphy.2017.73012.

  • D. T. Gillespie, E. Seitaridou, C. A. Gillespie. “The Small-Voxel Tracking Algorithm for Simulating Chemical Reactions among Diffusing Molecules”, The Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 141, December 2014, DOI: 10.1063/1.4903962.

  • D. T. Gillespie, L. Petzold, E. Seitaridou. “Validity Conditions for Stochastic Chemical Kinetics in Diffusion-Limited Systems”, The Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 140, February 2014, DOI: 054111.
  • D. T. Gillespie, E. Seitaridou. “Simple Brownian Diffusion: An Introduction to the Standard Theoretical Models”, Oxford University Press, October 2012.
  • E. Gardel, E. Seitaridou, K. Facto, E. Keene, K. Hattam, N. Easwar, N. Menon, N. “Dynamical Fluctuations in Dense Granular Flows”, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, Vol. 367(1909), December 2009, DOI:10.1098/rsta.2009.0189.
  • W. Ridgeway, E. Seitaridou, R. Phillips, J. Williamson. “RNA – Protein Binding Kinetics in an Automated Microfluidic Reactor”, Nucleic Acids Research, Vol. 37(21), September 2009, DOI:10.1093/nar/gkp733.
  • E. Seitaridou. “Non-Equilibrium Dynamics: Diffusion in Small Numbers and Ribosomal Self-Assembly”, Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Applied Physics, Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, U.S.A., May 2008.
  • E. Seitaridou, M. Inamdar, R. Phillips, K. Ghosh, K. Dill. “Measuring Flux Distributions for Diffusion in the Small-Numbers Limit”, The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 111, No. 9, pp. 2288-2292, February 2007, DOI: 10.1021/jp067036j.
  • K. Ghosh, K. Dill, M. Inamdar, E. Seitaridou, R. Phillips. “Teaching the Principles of Statistical Dynamics”, American Journal of Physics, Vol. 74, No. 2, pp. 123-133, February 2006. 
  • K. Kaliski, A. Mills-Tettey, E. Seitaridou, R. Collier, D. Fraser. “Low complexity, continuous, noise monitoring system for communities, small airports and remote areas”, Noise-Con (2001), Best student paper award, U.S. Patent No. 7,092,853 B2, August 2006. 

Presentations

  • M. Cheng, Z. Qiu, M. Rogers, E. Seitaridou. “Modeling Energy Use in the Oxford Science Building”, Oxford Research Scholars Symposium, Oxford, GA, April 21, 2017 (poster presentation).
  • Y. Dong, E. Seitaridou. “Quantifying Biofilm Formation of Sinorhizobium meliloti by Measuring the Diffusion Coefficient of Polystyrene Beads in Microfluidic Platforms”, Summer Undergraduate Research Experience at Emory University (SURE), Atlanta, GA, August 4, 2016 (poster presentation).
  • N. Jacob, S. Fankhauser, L. Talliafero-Smith, E. Seitaridou. “Integrating Undergraduate Research at Various Levels within a STEM Curriculum”, 17th Biennial Conference, Council for Undergraduate Research (CUR), Tampa, FL, June 26, 2016 (workshop presentation).
  • M. Dorian, E. Seitaridou. “Quantifying the Rate of Biofilm Growth of S. meliloti Strains in Microfluidics via the Diffusion Coefficient of Microspheres”, March Meeting, American Physical Society, Denver, CO, March 5, 2014 (poster presentation).
  • M. Dorian, E. Seitaridou. “Quantifying the Rate of Biofilm Growth of S. meliloti Strains via the Diffusion Coefficient of Microspheres within Microfluidics”, Atlanta Area Molecular and Cellular Biophysics Symposium, Biophysical Society, Atlanta, GA, December 7, 2013 (poster presentation, awarded 3rd prize).
  • M. Dorian, E. Seitaridou. “Quantifying the Rate of Biofilm Growth of S. meliloti Strains via the Diffusion Coefficient of Microspheres within Microfluidics”, Summer Undergraduate Research Experience at Emory University (SURE), Atlanta, GA, August 1, 2013 (poster presentation).
  • E. Seitaridou. “The President in a Crowded Room (and How the Higgs Particle Explains Mass)”, Lyceum talk series at Oxford College of Emory University, Oxford, GA, September 27, 2012.
  • C. Cheng, E. Seitaridou. “Tracking the Biofilm Development of S. meliloti by Observing the Diffusion of Microspheres inside Microfluidics”, Summer Undergraduate Research Experience at Emory University (SURE), Atlanta, GA, August 4, 2011 (poster presentation).
  • E. Seitaridou, F. Kamili. “Improving on Einstein’s Diffusion Theory with Microspheres in Solutions”, Physics Colloquium. Agnes Scott College, Atlanta, GA, September 17, 2010.
  • F. Kamili, E. Seitaridou. “Tracking Particles and Growth: The Diffusion Coefficient as an Indicator of Biofilm Development Inside Microfluidics”, Summer Undergraduate Research Experience at Emory University (SURE), Atlanta, GA, August 5, 2010 (poster presentation).
  • E. Seitaridou. “Microfluidics and the Study of Non-Equilibrium Systems”, Physics Colloquium, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, November 13, 2009.

Research Interests

  • Project I - Developing interdisciplinary experiments for the introductory physics curriculum: Students taking introductory physics are often unaware of the ways physics can be used to explain biological systems. I am interested in developing simple laboratory experiments in the area of biophysics that will allow students to see the various applications of the physical concepts and how interdisciplinary modern research is.
  • Project II - Understanding the diffusion mechanism in biofilms: The majority of bacteria in natural and pathogenic ecosystems are in groups called biofilms. Bacterial cells belonging to the same biofilm use diffusion in order to communicate, which makes diffusion critical to the survival of a biofilm. Diffusion inside a bacterial community can be observed by tracking a microsphere as it moves within the biofilm. The scope of this project is to conduct a comparative study of the diffusion of microspheres in biofilms formed by the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rhizobium, and an environmental bacterium collected from the Arabia Mountain in the Davidson-Arabia Mountain Nature Preserve in Lithonia, Ga. 
  • Project III – Theoretical work on Brownian motion and diffusion: The four most widely used theoretical models of diffusion (Fickian, Einstein’s, discrete-stochastic, and Langevin’s) have different domains of applicability depending on the spatial and temporal scales involved. My work with Dr. Dan Gillespie has focused on understanding the relative strengths and weaknesses of these models both from a theoretical standpoint and via the use of simulations.