Brad Hawley

Lecturer in English

Brad Hawley

Contact

678.266.7046

Dr. Brad Hawley, who has taught at Oxford College since 2005, received his B.A. in English Literature in 1993 from Presbyterian College, his M.A. in English Literature in 1995 from Clemson University, and his Ph.D. in English Literature and Composition in 2000 from the University of Oregon. After teaching at Clemson and the University of Oregon while working on his degrees, Dr. Hawley taught for two years as Assistant Professor of English at Jacksonville State University where he offered undergraduate and graduate courses in twentieth-century poetry and fiction, including courses on the Beat Generation. He also taught freshman writing, oral communication, and survey courses of British and American literature. While at Jacksonville, Dr. Hawley wrote book reviews for the local newspaper and hosted a jazz show on the college radio station.

Dr. Hawley is currently the editor of and writer for the review site Fantasy Literature:  http://www.fantasyliterature.com/author/brad-hawley/

His essays on the educational importance of reading comics and on how to read comics can be found at: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/series/reading-comics/


Education

BA| Presbyterian College| 1993

MA| Clemson University| 1995

PhD| University of Oregon| 2000

Courses Taught

Freshman Writing (English 185)

Crime Fiction

Comics and Graphic Novels

Shakespeare 

Research Interests

Dr. Hawley's areas of specialty include freshman composition and rhetoric as well as contemporary fiction and ethics, particularly in the genre of crimes fiction and the art form of graphic novels. His research and teaching are based on the literary criticism of Wayne C. Booth, who helped Dr. Hawley lay the theoretical groundwork for his dissertation, and grows out of his work in composition and rhetoric at the University of Oregon. As a contributing editor to John T. Gages third edition of The Shape of Reason: Argumentative Writing in College, Dr. Hawley made the case for keeping literature as a part of the freshman composition classroom.